How to Use NEC MultiProfiler



MultiProfiler is a great little tool from NEC. It’s essentially a calibration system without the calibration part – that is, you can set your monitor into all sorts of useful modes, but you don’t have to calibrate. The monitor is simply so good that it can set itself to your chosen target (say a sensible white-point like 5500 for warm fine art papers, a gamma of 2.2 and a luminosity of 100 cd/m2) and that’s it – you don’t need a sensor, you don’t need to wait while measurements are taken, the monitor just displays at the target you set, and you can immediately get on with your work. As long as this system works to an acceptable level of accuracy – you don’t need anything else!

Here’s the process and how easy it is:

Start MultiProfiler (which is a free download from here), then simply hit the edit button to define the target you want to work to. You can define whitepoint, brightness and black point (remember, whitepoint/blackpoint = contrast ratio), the gamut, and the gamma - it’s super easy!

Main Screen
Main Screen
Choose Preset
Choose Preset
Contrast
Contrast
Gamma
Gamma
Gamut
Gamut
White Point
White Point

When you are done, MultiProfiler will set your monitor to the target and in my experience (using our approximately one year old PA271W and double checking with both an i1Display Pro and a full i1 Photo Pro spectrophotometer), the results are very very close to the target. Meaning that in practice, one doesn’t really have to bother using a measuring device to use the PA series monitors with quite a high level of accuracy.

This isn’t to say that sensor based calibration is now useless – the results with a good sensor will most likely still be that bit more accurate, and over the life of the monitor one would reasonably expect the MultiProfiler accuracy to lessen, but for many people for the first couple years of their monitor’s life, it does mean that simply using the monitor out of the box, set to your desired target with MultiProfiler, is a very easy and good enough solution for a lot of working image maker. And it stuns me a little to be saying that!!