Please note Friday the 30th of September 2016 is a public holiday in Victoria, and Image Science will be closed. 

About Scanning Resolution

15th September 2015 Scanning


Resolution of film scanners vary greatly, but the higher the resolution doesn't always mean that they are the best. Even several years ago, you could buy a 4800 PPI film scanner from various makers like Epson, Canon, Microtek etc, which could handle film sizes from 35mm through to large format. The file sizes coming out of those scanners are huge - 1 gigabyte file from 35mm, but they are not optically sharp. The huge files are simply full of useless pixels containing no real detail.

Resolution is a complex topic, but it ultimately comes down to the quality of the optics and the sensor in a particular scanner.

Resolution is a complex topic, but it ultimately comes down to the quality of the optics and the sensor in a particular scanner. And you tend to get what you pay for. An Imacon scanner has a razor sharp Rodenstock lens combined with a fantastic Kodak sensor. That's what makes the Imacon so very good and far superior to flatbed film scanners, and far superior even to the desktop film scanners. The results from an Imacon at just 1600 PPI are better than an Epson flatbed at 4800 PPI.

The optics are so good in the Imacon that if you take, for instance, a sharp medium format 6 by 6cm shot and blow it up to poster size from an Imacon scan, it will be visibly superior to scans from Epsons, Nikons. You will also see noticeably better results in D-Max and superior tone separation. No matter how big the print you need, the Imacon scan will be better than other options like flatbeds and desktop film scanners as the true ability of the Imacon to resolve detail is far superior to other scanners, even those that claim to have a higher resolution.